Neater Way to Fix Accidental Yarn Over in the Next Row

Neater Way to Fix Accidental Yarn Over in the Next Row

Very few things are more frustrating than discovering an unwanted yarn over that’s been accidentally made in the previous row or round. It is especially painful when we have many stitches on the needles.

The common approach in this situation is to drop the sneaky yarn over and continue to work on the project as if nothing happened.

Neater Way to Fix Accidental Yarn Over in the Next Row

This solution is much more efficient than tinking back the previous row or round to get rid of that extra strand of yarn.

But dropping a yarn over and redistributing the yarn between the neighbouring stitches forms a section of looser fabric that doesn’t look good in most textures, but is especially noticeable in stitch patterns with a smoother texture, like stockinette stitch.

Over the years, I’ve been testing several ways to make a neater fix of an accidental yarn over. Eventually, I settled on the way explained in this tutorial.

Here’s how it works step by step. 

Accidental yarn overs are not the only reason we get unwanted holes in our projects. The holes also appear when we knit under the strand between two stitches, or turn the work mid-row after being destructed. To see how to deal with those issues, take a look at the tutorial called “Unwanted Holes”


To download a 9-page PDF with the step-by-step photo tutorial about this method, click here to join the All Tutorials Club 2022.

If you are already a member of the Club,
click here to download this PDF from the Club dashboard.

Neater Way to Fix Accidental Yarn Over in the Next Row | 10 rows a day
Neater Way to Fix Accidental Yarn Over in the Next Row | 10 rows a day
Neater Way to Fix Accidental Yarn Over in the Next Row | 10 rows a day

If you enjoyed this tutorial,
here’s something else you might find helpful:

“Neat Side Edges” Book

Learn twelve ways to make side edges of a knitted project nice and tidy. Plus, ways to fix side edges, and a way to improve edges of finished projects.


Happy knitting!

Maryna Shevchenko - www.10rowsaday.com

Let’s be friends on GoodReads 🙂