How to Improve Side Edges After the Project is Finished

There is a number of ways to improve side edgings and make them look nice. Most of those ways require some planning. We should plan to add extra stitches and remember to work them in a certain way to create nice edges.

But what to do when we want to fix edges in a finished project? There is a fairly simple way to turn ugly (let’s admit it!) side edges into a lovely chain that not only looks great but also keeps the edges from curling. That little feature is especially important if your project is worked in a stockinette, or stockinette-based stitch pattern.

I’ve learned this tip from an incredibly helpful book “The Principles of Knitting” by June Hemmons Hiatt. It states that we are “unlikely to find it (this edging) elsewhere“, so we can assume that the author either invented it or discovered it in one of the old knitting books that are not readily available nowadays. In any case, this simple edging definitely deserves to be known and remembered.

Here’s how to make it.

If you are a visual learner, watch every step described below in this video tutorial.

MATERIALS

This way to make an edging is done with a crochet hook. You don’t have to be an expert crocheter to make it, but you do need a crochet hook. I find that this technique works best when we use a crochet hook that is smaller than the size of the needles we used to make the fabric.

To make the swatch shown in the photos, I used 10 mm (US size 15) knitting needles, and I’ll use an 8 mm (L-11) crochet hook to make the edging.

Because we are adding the edging to a finished project, we can make it in any colour we like. For most projects, it makes sense to use the same yarn that the project is made of, but if you want to make a decorative edging, use the same yarn but in a different colour.

I’ll use yarn in a contrasting colour, but not because I want to make a decorative edge. My reasons are more pragmatic – I simply want to make it easier for you to understand how this little technique works.

INSTRUCTIONS

Place the project so that the right side of the work is facing you. We’ll start at the cast on edge and will work towards the bind off edge.

RIGHT SIDE EDGING

1. Insert the crochet hook from left to right under the inner leg of the edge stitch in the first row of the project.

2. Fold the yarn leaving a small tail, and place the fold on the crochet hook.

3. Pull the yarn through the work.

4. Now insert the hook from left to right under the inner leg of the edge stitch in the next row of the project.

5. Wrap the head of the crochet hook with the working yarn.

6. Pull the wrap through the work and through the loop that is already on the crochet hook.

Repeat steps 4, 5 and 6 to work a chain of stitches along the right edge of the work.

When you get to the bind off edge, cut the yarn leaving a small tail (around 10 cm / 4″) and pull the last loop out of the work. Watch how to do it.

Then weave in both tails.

LEFT SIDE EDGING

The edging at the left side of the work is done in exactly the same way as the edging at the right side. The only difference is that now we’ll insert the hook into the work from right to left. Here’s how we do it step by step.

1. Insert the crochet hook from right to left under the inner leg of the edge stitch in the first row of the project.

2. Fold the yarn leaving a small tail, and place the fold on the crochet hook.

3. Pull the yarn through the work.

4. Now insert the hook from right to left under the inner leg of the edge stitch in the next row of the project.

5. Wrap the head of the crochet hook with the working yarn.

6. Pull the wrap through the work and through the loop that is already on the crochet hook.

Repeat steps 4, 5 and 6 to work a chain of stitches along the left edge of the work.

When you get to the bind off edge, cut the yarn leaving a small tail and pull the last loop out of the work.

Weave in both tails and enjoy the look of the beautiful edges you’ve just created.

This edging is not fully reversible, though it does look quite nice on the wrong side of the work, especially if the edging is done in the same colour as the work.


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Happy knitting 🙂


How to Improve Side Edges After the Project is Finished | 10 rows a day
How to Improve Side Edges After the Project is Finished | 10 rows a day
How to Improve Side Edges After the Project is Finished | 10 rows a day