Centered Double Increase – Step by Step

A few weeks ago I made a tutorial about a double vertical decrease, and I’ve got a comment with a question about the best way to make a double increase that matches the look of the double vertical decrease.

After doing some research and quite a bit of swatching, I’ve found out that the best match is the increase suggested by Elizabeth Zimmermann in her book “Knitting Without Tears”.

This increase is fairly simple, and it creates a lovely chain of stitches at the centre of the increase just like the chain of stitches created at the centre of the double vertical decrease.

Here’s how to make this neat double increase. 

All steps described below are also shown in this video tutorial.

STEP 1

Work to the stitch that will be at the centre of the increase.

STEP 2

Place your left index finger from back to front under the strand of the working yarn, then move your finger counter-clockwise to make a loop so that the working yarn in at the top of the loop. Watch how to do it. Place this loop on the right needle. 

Pull the yarn to adjust the size of the loop.

STEP 3

Knit the next stitch. It will be the stitch at the centre of the increase.

STEP 4

Now place your left index finger from front to back under the working yarn, move your finger clockwise to make a loop so that the working yarn in at the bottom of the loop. Watch how to do it.  Place this loop on the right needle. 

Pull the yarn to adjust the size of the loop.

That’s how simple it is. We’ve just increased two stitches with one perfectly vertical stitch at the very centre of the increase. 

Now continue to work in the pattern to the end of the row or round. This increase is made in exactly the same way both when we work flat and when we work in the round.

It is important to remember to purl the central stitch in the wrong side row (or knit it in the next round, if you work in the round) to keep the chain of stitches uninterrupted. Then the increase will look very similar to the double vertical decrease.

The biggest challenge with this increase is to make the loops correctly without mixing them up. It helps to pay attention to the position of the working yarn right after we make the loop. In the first increase, the working yarn should be at the front of the loop, and in the second increase – at the back. It’s quite logical to remember “first front, then back”.

Otherwise, it’s a perfect way to make a double increase that not just looks nice, but also doesn’t cram the fabric. Plus, as you see, it is quite easy to do.


If you enjoyed this tutorial,
here’s something else you might find helpful:

“Neat Side Edges” Book

Learn twelve ways to make side edges of a knitted project nice and tidy. Plus, ways to fix side edges, and a way to improve edges of finished projects.


Happy knitting!

Maryna Shevchenko - www.10rowsaday.com

Let’s be friends on GoodReads 🙂

Double increase that matches double vertical decrease | 10 rows a day
Centered double increase - step by step | 10 rows a day
Great way to increase two stitches | 10 rows a day
Double increase step by step | 10 rows a day