Three Ways to Attach a New Colour to a Project

Three Ways to Attach a New Colour to a Project

No matter whether we want to add a few stripes to the project or to work in a more complicated colour pattern, at some point we have to attach the yarn in a new colour to the work. The question is: "What is the best way to do it?" Well, the best way is the one that feels better to you. 

In this tutorial, I'll show you three ways to add a new colour to your knitting. Try them all and choose the one you like best.

Each way described below works for changing colours both at the beginning and in the middle of a row. That means you can use them when you knit back and forth or in the round.

If you are a visual learner, click here to watch every step in a video tutorial.

WAY #1

This way is the easiest because it does not require any special actions to attach the yarn. When it's time to change the colour, we simply start knitting with the new yarn.

Here's how it happens step by step:

1. Work to the spot where you need to change the colour. It could be the very beginning of a row or at any place inside the row or round (as is the case with the swatch in the photo below).

Three Ways to Attach a New Colour to a Project

2. Insert the right needle into the next stitch and place the new yarn on the tip of the right needle, leaving a tail around 10 cm / 4" long. 

Three Ways to Attach a New Colour to a Project

 

3. Pull the wrap through to make a new stitch.

Three Ways to Attach a New Colour to a Project

Then use the new yarn as your working yarn to make a segment in the new colour. As to the old yarn, you can cut it leaving a tail around 10 cm / 4" long, or you can carry the yarn up the work.

Three Ways to Attach a New Colour to a Project

The only drawback of this method is that the last stitch worked in the old yarn and the first stitch working in the new yarn are not secured and can get quite loose. 

It's an issue that is easily fixed later on when we weave in the ends. Simply pull the tails to adjust the size of those stitches before you hide the tails inside the project. Or, weave in the tails as you knit

WAY #2

This way solves the issue with the loose stitches, but it requires making a knot. Many knitters don't like making knots, and that's understandable - we all want our knits to be impeccable. In this case, making a small knot could be a sacrifice worth making, especially if you work with a slippery yarn.

Here's how this way works (you can also watch it in this part of the video tutorial):

1. When it's time to change the colour, tie the new yarn around the strand of the old yarn with a simple knot. Leave a tail around 10 cm / 4" to weave in later on.

Three Ways to Attach a New Colour to a Project

2. Pull the knot tight and move it as close to the bottom of the stitch as you can. 

Three Ways to Attach a New Colour to a Project

3. Then continue to knit using the new yarn as your working yarn.

Three Ways to Attach a New Colour to a Project

As you see, the knot is not bulky at all even though the yarn I used to make the swatch is quite thick. It seems to be a nice compromise in the "to knot or not to knot" question.

WAY #3

This way adds a bit of bulk to the join, but it will not show if the yarn is not too thick, or if the place of join is not very visible. The good thing about this way of joining yarn - it creates a lovely clean look without any loose stitches or knots.

1. Work to one stitch before the spot where you plan to add a new colour. Then measure around 5 cm / 2" of working yarn from the bottom of the last worked stitch and fold the yarn creating a loop. This step is shown in this part of the video tutorial.

Three Ways to Attach a New Colour to a Project

2. Insert the new yarn into that loop and fold the new yarn leaving a tail around 10 cm / 4". Now we have two interlocking loops.

Three Ways to Attach a New Colour to a Project

3. Use two strands of the folded old yarn to work the next stitch.

Three Ways to Attach a New Colour to a Project

4. Pull the old yarn to make the loop smaller so that the place of join (the spot where two loops interlock) is at the bottom of the stitch we've just worked.

Three Ways to Attach a New Colour to a Project

5. Use two strands of the folded new yarn to work the next stitch.

Three Ways to Attach a New Colour to a Project

Continue to work in pattern using the new yarn as your working yarn. Remember to treat the double-stranded stitches as one when you work the next row or round.

Three Ways to Attach a New Colour to a Project

Here they are - three ways to add a new colour to a project. Let me know which one of them you like best. Thank you :-)

Three Ways to Attach a New Colour in Knitting | 10 rows a day
How to Attach a New yarn to a Project - Three Ways | 10 rows a day
Three Ways to Attach a New Colour to a Project | 10 rows a day

If you like this tutorial, you will LOVE e-books and charts
in the Library of Free Knitting Resources

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Here are a few more things you might like:

Happy knitting :-)